Parents say CPS took their 3 kids away because they wanted to visit dying relative

- “What CPS is doing to these parents is wrong,” said attorney Julie Ketterman.

The Giwa’s turned to FOX 26 last May after their then 19-month-old son Ali was taken into protective custody by CPS.

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Parents say CPS took their 3 kids away because they wanted to visit dying relative

CPS accused the parents of medical neglect even though doctors could not explain why he was failing to thrive like his twin sister.

“They’ve run test,  after test, after test, and there’s nothing,” Ketterman said.

In June, Ali was returned home to his parents and siblings, but CPS had two conditions.

One, they told the parents not to talk to the media.

“I’m not scared. I will do this again, and again, and again,” Ali’s mom Kathy Giwa said.

CPS also ordered the parents to undergo yet another round of psychological testing.

“By a CPS contractor because they know that it’s going to come back saying what they want it to say,” said Ketterman.

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Father Submits Video About CPS to the Operation Paul Revere Contest

mqdefault[5]The film maker is a father whose baby was detained by CPS at birth due to an accusation of medical neglect. His outstanding video exposing the corruption of CPS was recently posted to YouTube and submitted to the Paul Revere video contest.

N.J. child welfare agency proposes less disclosure in fatal child abuse cases

Christiana Glenn, 8, who died from malnutrition and medical neglect in 2011, is seen in this 2007 photo provided by a relative. The Department of Children and Families, which came under scrutiny for its handling of the family's case, has proposed scaling back information it publicly releases when a child dies or suffers a near-death injury related to abuse or neglect.Bob Sciarrino  TRENTON — The state Department of Children and Families plans to limit the information it publicly discloses when a child dies or suffers life-threatening injuries from abuse and neglect "to protect the privacy rights of vulnerable children," according to a draft of the new rule. Allison Blake, the commissioner of Children and Family Services, says the disclosures can bring harm to the children, but at least one child advocacy group questions whether the change was intended to protect the agency’s reputation. Federal and state law requires that when a child dies or is seriously hurt by a parent or caretaker, the child welfare agency must, upon request, disclose the child’s name, whether the agency has ever investigated the family, and the outcome of the inquiries. Blake has called for "limiting the release of information regarding the (state’s) involvement with the child and family prior to the incident" that led to the child’s endangerment, according to the proposed rule in the April 15 issue of the New Jersey Register, a bimonthly journal that publishes new state regulations. The department would release information only "to the extent it is pertinent to the child abuse or neglect that led to the fatality or near fatality," the proposed rule says Kristine Brown, a spokeswoman for the agency, said in a statement that the rule changes "are not intended to limit access to public information ... but rather are intended to comply with all federal requirements as it applies to the disclosure of client information." "Under the proposal, information in DCF records with little relevance to the abuse or neglect that resulted in a fatality or near fatality would not be publicly releasable," Brown said. But Advocates for Children of New Jersey, a nonprofit child welfare watchdog group, urged Blake to reconsider any changes regarding how she carries out the Children Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, also known as the CAPTA law. Cecilia Zalkind, the group’s executive director, and Mary Coogan, the assistant director, said in a statement that by not defining "pertinent," the department could arbitrarily decide to keep information private that would embarrass the state. Often there is a trail of investigations by a child’s caseworker that precedes a death from abuse or neglect, Zalkind and Coogan noted. "If the department has the sole discretion to determine what information is ‘pertinent,’ how will the public find out if the agency made a determination that certain actions or inactions in the past did not contribute to the fatality or near-fatality, when reasonable minds could differ?" they asked. "As difficult as these ... cases are, we must remember that the CAPTA mandates exist to protect children and families, not the agencies that serve them," the statement added. "The disclosure of public information is an effective means to improve case practice, which can result in keeping New Jersey’s children safer." The top official at Children’s Rights, the national advocacy group whose class-action lawsuit spawned a huge court-supervised overhaul of child welfare services over the last decade, said it was too soon to judge the effect of the change. "Anytime a child dies due to abuse or neglect, it is vital for child welfare systems to be open about their history with the child, in accordance with federal standards," said Marcia Robinson Lowry, the executive director of Children’s Rights. "It will be important to see how the state applies this standard and what kind of information they make available." The department proposed the rule change in response to the Obama administration, which last fall clarified the official Child Welfare Policy Manual and defined what information could be released to the public. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ "goal in changing the language was for greater disclosure, not less," said Christina Riehl, senior staff attorney for the Child Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law. "We feared this would happen." RELATED COVERAGE • DYFS commissioner defends agency's handling of case involving 8-year-old Irvington girl FOLLOW STAR-LEDGER POLITICS: TWITTER | FACEBOOK       Email 	 Related Stories Toms River man dies of heroin overdose Hospital looking for friends and family of man found in Elizabeth Add Your Comment Sign in with your NJ.com or Facebook account Sort By:  10 comments so far Pause Live Updates » jbfosterabuseprevention This is horrible, and it just reinforces why this issue doesn't get enough attention. It bothers to no end that states try to cover this kind of stuff up, and that they say "we don't have enough money". My fiance and I started a foundation that will (hopefully) join hands with Advocates for Children of New Jersey (and other like-organizations) to put an end to foster abuse. Period. Yesterday · Reply Jessica Brianne Foster Abuse Prevention Foundation the address is http://www.stopfostercareabuse.org for those interested. Yesterday · Reply cosmicinnj THis agency is also very politically influenced. In DYFS matters there is a Deputy Attorney General and usually a Guardian ad Litem who represents the child/ren. In Middlesex County all to often children have been exploited and crimes against the children have been generated not on merit but greed and political patronage. 2 Days Ago · Reply cosmicinnj BTW In Middlesex County, Assignment Judge Frances likes to appoint "new Judges" like Carlia Brady and former Woodbridge Prosecutor/Director Freeholder Chris Rafano to the Family Court section, need I say more? 2 Days Ago · Reply TMoor Governor Christie promised greater government transparency and accountability, and what the public gets is less of both. cosmicinnj likes this. 2 Days Ago · Reply Watchman The balance between protecting the innocent from unwarranted notoriety and harm through confidentiality laws and rules, and the public's right to know about the performance of its agencies in these serious death and near death cases, is being tilted away from responsibility and towards concealment by this proposed change.   Apparently, a step backwards behind a curtain of self-serving secrecy.  cosmicinnj likes this. 2 Days Ago · Reply tashilama THE ONLY WAY THAT THERE IS ACCOUNTABILITY IS TO HAVE ACCESS TO THE INFORMATION. THE COURTS HAVE ELIMINATED ACCOUNTABILITY BY DUMPING CHILD PLACEMENT REVIEW. NO ONE HAS THE ABILITY TO HOLD DYFS ACCOUNTABLE WITHOUT THE RELEVANT INFORMATION. DYFS, DON'T COVER UP!! 2 Days Ago · Reply chris905 No one is holding the head of DYFS accountable, or asking why someone who has no relevant work experience or degree is heading DYFS. Why are you keeping this embarrassing Corzine holdover, Comm. Blake? TMoor and Jenelle DeMarco like this. 2 Days Ago · Reply score09 Just outrageous...    As if the murder of Christiana Glenn isn't enough of an embarrassment. cosmicinnj likes this. 2 Days Ago · Reply canibeyourfriend13 COVER UP AND SWEEP IT UNDER THE RUG    Children are to be protected and DYFS gets them killed. Do not report any of this. cosmicinnj likes this. 2 Days Ago · Reply

Christiana Glenn, 8, who died from malnutrition and medical neglect in 2011, is seen in this 2007 photo provided by a relative. The Department of Children and Families, which came under scrutiny for its handling of the family's case, has proposed scaling back information it publicly releases when a child dies or suffers a near-death injury related to abuse or neglect.                         Bob Sciarrino

TRENTON — The state Department of Children and Families plans to limit the information it publicly discloses when a child dies or suffers life-threatening injuries from abuse and neglect "to protect the privacy rights of vulnerable children," according to a draft of the new rule.

Allison Blake, the commissioner of Children and Family Services, says the disclosures can bring harm to the children, but at least one child advocacy group questions whether the change was intended to protect the agency’s reputation.

Federal and state law requires that when a child dies or is seriously hurt by a parent or caretaker, the child welfare agency must, upon request, disclose the child’s name, whether the agency has ever investigated the family, and the outcome of the inquiries.

Blake has called for "limiting the release of information regarding the (state’s) involvement with the child and family prior to the incident" that led to the child’s endangerment, according to the proposed rule in the April 15 issue of the New Jersey Register, a bimonthly journal that publishes new state regulations.

The department would release information only "to the extent it is pertinent to the child abuse or neglect that led to the fatality or near fatality," the proposed rule says
Kristine Brown, a spokeswoman for the agency, said in a statement that the rule changes "are not intended to limit access to public information ... but rather are intended to comply with all federal requirements as it applies to the disclosure of client information."

"Under the proposal, information in DCF records with little relevance to the abuse or neglect that resulted in a fatality or near fatality would not be publicly releasable," Brown said.

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A version of this column originally appeared in feedproxy.google.com.

CPS office served with a criminal search warrant. About time!

Airmans Wife Toddler DeathLUBBOCK, Texas — Police have launched a rare investigation of the Texas child protection agency after a 22-month-old girl died and her mother claimed her military husband’s deployment overseas left her too stressed to care for their three children.

Abilene police Chief Stan Standridge said in an emailed statement Tuesday that the department began investigating the local Child Protective Services office after “certain CPS supervisors” refused to cooperate with officers investigating the Aug. 28 death of Tamryn Klapheke.

The girl died at an Abilene hospital after being found unresponsive at her home at Dyess Air Force Base. She weighed only 17.5 pounds and her body had chemical burns, indicating she had been exposed to human waste, according to a preliminary autopsy report from the Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Office in Fort Worth. It said Tamryn suffered dehydration and malnutrition from a lack of basic care over a period of time.

Her mother, Tiffany Nicole Klapheke, faces three felony charges of injury to child. After her arrest, she claimed she was too stressed by her husband’s deployment to care for their three young children.

Agency spokesman Patrick Crimmins said a Child Protective Services caseworker assigned to investigate allegations of medical neglect against Klapheke closed the case soon after being promoted to supervisor and just six days before Tamryn died.

In doing so, the employee violated agency guidelines that require a final face-to-face visit and someone else to sign off on the closure, he said.

“You want to see the family again because you don’t know what might have changed since you saw them,” Crimmins said.

The employee hadn’t seen the family in about 10 months when she closed the case, he said. She resigned a couple of weeks after Tamryn died. Phone numbers listed in the former caseworker’s name were either disconnected or had a continuous busy signal Tuesday.

Her former supervisor, who oversaw the investigation of the allegations, has been disciplined, he added.

“It was a bad case, admittedly,” Crimmins said, referring to how it was handled. “There’s no question about that.”

He said a criminal investigation of the agency was “rare” and that “we are cooperating fully with Abilene police.”

Standridge and Taylor County District Attorney James Eidson declined to say what charges police are considering. However, Standridge said officers executed a search warrant on the local CPS office and a supervisor’s home and car Tuesday morning after finding probable cause to suggest documents and other evidence existed to support allegations of evidence tampering.

Eidson said “there is more than one person” being investigated at the office.

According to the search warrant affidavit, a regional director, a program director and an investigative supervisor are suspected of tampering with evidence. A phone number listed for one of them had been disconnected by Tuesday, and there were no public listings for the other two. Their names are being withheld because no charges have been filed.

Klapheke remained jailed Tuesday in lieu of $500,000 bond. Jail records did not list an attorney for her.

Her two other daughters, ages 6 months and 3 years when Tamryn died, were treated for severe neglect at a children’s hospital in Fort Worth, about 150 miles east of Abilene. They are now in foster care, Crimmins said.

There was a backlog of cases in the Abilene office at the time of the toddler’s death due to a shortage of caseworkers, he said. Instead of 16 caseworkers, there were six.

There’s a shortage of caseworkers statewide, he said, and chronic turnover is an issue. As of Oct. 12, the state had 1,495 case workers – more than 400 less than it should have, he said.

We have been reporting CPS for years and the police just do not care about our children being stolen if they would check some of have evidence that would put these people behind bars for life-(just sayin) you may want to check. Because if something happens to a child we have been telling you about then it becomes your fault.

found this article on Huffingtton Post

A version of this column originally appeared in donnellyjustice.me.